Frakir Is X

autisticlynx:

when privileged groups want rights, safety, and respect, it’s called “basic human decency”

when oppressed groups want rights, safety, and respect, it’s called “social justice”

13 hours agohawtisticautisticlynx 10,516 notes

lancrebitch:

blusunday:

huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP

The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.

Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.

Genius

i’m not crying you’re crying

14 hours agoaccrementitioushuffingtonpost 150,519 notes

kaylainwanderland:

jean-luc-gohard:

An “egalitarian” is someone who, realizing that a scale is imbalanced because there are six pounds on one side and twelve on the other, seeks to correct the imbalance by adding six pounds to both sides.

well that was the best damn explanation I’ve seen. 

15 hours agofyeahcrackerjean-luc-gohard 16,781 notes
kill me?

kill me?

1 day ago 1 note#kill me?

imsirius:

DAN: When you do interviews, you’re faced with the choice to either be the most boring person on earth or just get ridiculous things written about you from time to time
JOSH HOROWITZ: Sometimes it might be good to be boring
DAN: It might be but I just get bored of myself

                                [Happy 25th Birthday Daniel Radcliffe! (23 July 1989)]

1 day agojesuisbeowulfimsirius 28,023 notes#daniel radcliffe #hp

gorrgon:

for a person who isn’t exclusively attracted to people of the same gender I sure do say im gay a lot

1 day agohawtisticgorrgon 22,688 notes#yeaaaaah

bloggingfrominsidethetardis:

modern Hogwarts headcanon

muggleborn sixth years jumping from moving staircase to moving staircase shouting “PARKOUR”

1 day agojesuisbeowulfbloggingfrominsidethetardis 21,653 notes#hp

brace yourselves… w i n t e r   i s   c o m i n g

2 days agoagabeofthronesmycroftly 12,892 notes#got
Anonymous asked: how would you describe your aesthetic?

kosherqueer:

image

2 days agoleepacesfaceskosherqueer 15,004 notes#i laughed unreasonably at this

tastefullyoffensive:

Artist Chris McMahon buys other people’s landscape paintings at thrift stores and puts monsters in them.

Previously: Artist Repaints His Own Childhood Drawings

2 days agoway-to-go-caligulatastefullyoffensive 44,765 notes#art

The Number 47

3 days agojesuisbeowulfthevoyagereternals 2,415 notes#star trek #47 #pomona

butthickey:

creativlog:

Band-aid that goes through chemical changes to match your skintone

they look so happy about having suffered minor wounds to the face

3 days agojesuisbeowulfcreativlog 362,921 notes#science #but how??

punsicle:

have you ever stayed up late with someone texting or chatting and known as the hours ticked by that you’d be ridiculously tired in the morning but it didnt matter because it was really fun and totally worth losing sleep over just to laugh with someone and enjoy their company maybe and then the next day you keep tiredly recalling how much fun it was while you’re falling asleep in class and that makes it not so bad that you’re tired anymore

3 days agohawtisticzachabee-deactivated654323 371,644 notes#ughhh god this makes me miss ppl #T_T
stelmarias:

I made a friend.

#mylife

stelmarias:

I made a friend.

#mylife

3 days agostelmarias 4 notes#spiders cw
goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.
Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.
"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.
"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.
Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.
Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.
One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.
Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.
Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.

"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "

In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.

"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.

Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.

Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.

One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.

Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.

Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

4 days agogoodstuffhappenedtoday 3,032 notes#science
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